high quality Bunker Hill: A City, A discount wholesale Siege, A Revolution (The American Revolution Series) online

high quality Bunker Hill: A City, A discount wholesale Siege, A Revolution (The American Revolution Series) online

high quality Bunker Hill: A City, A discount wholesale Siege, A Revolution (The American Revolution Series) online
high quality Bunker Hill: A City, A discount wholesale Siege, A Revolution (The American Revolution Series) online__front

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The bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Mayflower, and In the Hurricane''s Eye tells the story of the Boston battle that ignited the American Revolution, in this "masterpiece of narrative and perspective." (Boston Globe)

In the opening volume of his acclaimed American Revolution series, Nathaniel Philbrick turns his keen eye to pre-Revolutionary Boston and the spark that ignited the American Revolution. In the aftermath of the Boston Tea Party and the violence at Lexington and Concord, the conflict escalated and skirmishes gave way to outright war in the Battle of Bunker Hill. It was the bloodiest conflict of the revolutionary war, and the point of no return for the rebellious colonists. Philbrick gives us a fresh view of the story and its dynamic personalities, including John Adams, Samuel Adams, John Hancock, Paul Revere, and George Washington. With passion and insight, he reconstructs the revolutionary landscape—geographic and ideological—in a mesmerizing narrative of the robust, messy, blisteringly real origins of America.

Review

“Masterly… Philbrick tells the complex story superbly.”
Wall Street Journal

“A masterpiece of narrative and perspective…”— Boston Globe

“You will delight in the story and the multitude of details Philbrick offers up.”— USA Today

“Riveting, fast-paced account…”— Los Angeles Times

“Lively…Philbrick, guides us beautifully through Revolutionary Boston…”
New York Times Book Review

“Philbrick writes with freshness and clarity…”— St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“This is popular history at its best: a taut narrative with a novelist’s touch, grounded in careful research.”— Miami Herald

“Philbrick … has a flair for using primary sources to create scenes that sweep readers into the thick of history…BUNKER HILL is a tour de force, creating as vivid a picture as we are likely to get of the first engagements of the American Revolution…Philbrick is a gifted researcher and storyteller…”— Chicago Tribune

“Philbrick…offers…surprising revelations and others in BUNKER HILL, a comprehensive and absorbing account of a battle…Extraordinary events produce extraordinary individuals, and Philbrick’s portrayals are remarkably penetrating and vivid…Given the scale of the story, Philbrick, confirming his standing as one of America’s pre-eminent historians, somehow manages to address all the essential components in a concise, readable style”— Cleveland Plain Dealer

“Like a masterly chronicler, [Philbrick] has produced a tightly focused and richly detailed narrative that just happens to resonate with leadership lessons for all times….Philbrick is at his most vivid in conveying scenes of battle, both on the road between Boston and Concord and on the ridges of Bunker Hill. But what adds depth to the narrative is his fine sense of the ambitions that drive people in war and politics.”
Washington Post

“Another fine history from Nathaniel Philbrick…”— The Economist

“Though you know the ending, you whip through the pages…”— Entertainment Weekly

“Quite masterfully, Philbrick does not sink to simply good and evil distinctions in the run-up to Bunker Hill. The author reminds us that the freedoms colonists wanted were never intended to apply to blacks, American Indians or women. This was a messy time when decisions were sometimes dictated by ambition instead of some nobler trait.”— Minneapolis Star-Tribune

“[Philbrick] captures the drama—martial and emotional—of the months before and after this legendary clash.”— The New Yorker

“Philbrick spices his text with first-person accounts from many participants in the drama, including patriots, loyalists, generals, privates, spies, even the victim of a tar-and-feathering. This is easy-reading history, uncluttered by footnotes and assisted by some excellent maps.”— Seattle Times

 



“Fascinating….No one can tell you about the history you thought you knew quite like Philbrick…”
Cape Cod Times

  “Philbrick … will be a candidate for another award with this ingenious, bottom-up look at Boston from the time of the December 1773 Tea Party to the iconic June 1775 battle….A rewarding approach to a well-worn subject, rich in anecdotes, opinion, bloodshed and Byzantine political maneuvering.”— Kirkus (Starred Review)

“Exhaustively researched, intelligent, and engaging narrative with a sophisticated approach. Collections … should certainly acquire this….”— Library Journal

“Philbrick tells his tale in traditional fashion—briskly, colorfully, and with immediacy….no one has told this tale better.”— Publishers Weekly

“Crackling accounts of military movements…a superior talent for renewing interest in a famed event, Philbrick will again be in high demand from history buffs.”— Booklist

“Philbrick shows us historic figures, not only as if they had stepped away from their famous portraits, but as if we had read about them in last week’s newspaper…Philbrick has developed a style that connects the power of narrative to decisive moments in American history.” — Nantucket Today

“A compelling, balanced and fresh narrative.” — Christian Science Monitor

“Philbrick’s research is phenomenal …I suggest you pick up this enjoyable read.” — Washington Independent Review of Books

“You’ll never have history told like this in school. If it were, you might find more kids interested in it.” —The State Journal-Register
“A gripping, suspense-driven recounting of the battles of Bunker and Breed’s Hill…I couldn’t put this book down with its seductive, detail-sharpened, heart-stopping narrative made all the more human by the people involved…powerful, eloquent, infinitely compelling, and just plain awesome.” — Providence Journal

About the Author

Nathaniel Philbrick is the author of In the Heart of the Sea, winner of the National Book Award; Mayflower, finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; Bunker Hill, winner of the New England Book Award; Sea of Glory; The Last Stand; Why Read Moby Dick?; and Away Off Shore. He lives in Nantucket. His newest book, Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution, will be published in May 2016.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Preface: The Decisive Day

On a hot, almost windless afternoon in June, a seven-year-old boy stood beside his mother and looked out across the green islands of Boston Harbor. To the northwest, sheets of fire and smoke rose from the base of a distant hill. Even though the fighting was at least ten miles away, the concussion of the great guns burst like bubbles across his tear-streaked face.

At that moment, John Adams, the boy’s father, was more than three hundred miles to the south at the Continental Congress in Philadelphia. Years later, the elder Adams claimed that the American Revolution had started not with the Boston Massacre, or the Tea Party, or the skirmishes at Lexington and Concord and all the rest, but had been “effected before the war commenced . . . in the minds and hearts of the people.” For his son, however, the “decisive day” (a phrase used by the boy’s mother, Abigail) was June 17, 1775.

Seventy-one years after that day, in the jittery script of an old man, John Quincy Adams described the terrifying afternoon when he and his mother watched the battle from a hill beside their home in Braintree: “I saw with my own eyes those fires, and heard Britannia’s thunders in the Battle of Bunker’s hill and witnessed the tears of my mother and mingled with them my own.” They feared, he recounted, that the British troops might at any moment march out of Boston and “butcher them in cold blood” or take them as hostages and drag them back into the besieged city. But what he remembered most about the battle was the hopeless sense of sorrow that he and his mother felt when they learned that their family physician, Dr. Joseph Warren, had been killed.

Warren had saved John Quincy Adams’s badly fractured forefinger from amputation, and the death of this “beloved physician” was a terrible blow to a boy whose father’s mounting responsibilities required that he spend months away from home. Even after John Quincy Adams had grown into adulthood and become a public figure, he refused to attend all anniversary celebrations of the Battle of Bunker Hill. Joseph Warren, just thirty-four at the time of his death, had been much more than a beloved doctor to a seven-year-old boy. Over the course of the two critical months between the outbreak of hostilities at Lexington Green and the Battle of Bunker Hill, he became the most influential patriot leader in the province of Massachusetts. As a member of the Committee of Safety, he had been the man who ordered Paul Revere to alert the countryside that British soldiers were headed to Concord; as president of the Provincial Congress, he had overseen the creation of an army even as he waged a propaganda campaign to convince both the American and British people that Massachusetts was fighting for its survival in a purely defensive war. While his more famous compatriots John Adams, John Hancock, and Samuel Adams were in Philadelphia at the Second Continental Congress, Warren was orchestrating the on-the-ground reality of a revolution.

Warren had only recently emerged from the shadow of his mentor Samuel Adams when he found himself at the head of the revolutionary movement in Massachusetts, but his presence (and absence) were immediately felt. When George Washington assumed command of the provincial army gathered outside Boston just two and a half weeks after the Battle of Bunker Hill, he was forced to contend with the confusion and despair that followed Warren’s death. Washington’s ability to gain the confidence of a suspicious, stubborn, and parochial assemblage of New England militiamen marked the advent of a very different kind of leadership. Warren had passionately, often impulsively, tried to control the accelerating cataclysm. Washington would need to master the situation deliberately and—above all—firmly. Thus, the Battle of Bunker Hill is the critical turning point in the story of how a rebellion born in the streets of Boston became a countrywide war for independence.

This is also the story of two British generals. The first, Thomas Gage, was saddled with the impossible task of implementing his government’s unnecessarily punitive response to the Boston Tea Party in December 1773. Gage had a scrupulous respect for the law and was therefore ill equipped to subdue a people who were perfectly willing to take that law into their own hands. When fighting broke out at Lexington and Concord, militiamen from across the region descended upon the British stationed at Boston. Armed New Englanders soon cut off the land approaches to Boston. Ironically, the former center of American resistance found itself gripped by an American siege. By the time General William Howe replaced Gage as the British commander in chief, he had determined that New York, not Boston, was where he must resume the fight. It was left to Washington to hasten the departure of Howe and his army. The evacuation of the British in March 1776 signaled the beginning of an eight-year war that produced a new nation. But it also marked the end of an era that had started back in 1630 with the founding of the Puritan settlement called Boston. This is the story of how a revolution changed that 146-year-old community—of what was lost and what was gained when 150 vessels filled with British soldiers and American loyalists sailed from Boston Harbor for the last time.

Over the more than two centuries since the Revolution, Boston has undergone immense physical change. Most of the city’s once-defining hills have been erased from the landscape while the marshes and mudflats that surrounded Boston have been filled in to eliminate almost all traces of the original waterfront. But hints of the vanished town remain. Several meetinghouses and churches from the colonial era are still standing, along with a smattering of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century houses. Looking southeast from the balcony of the Old State House, you can see how the spine of what was once called King Street connects this historic seat of government, originally known as the Town House, to Long Wharf, an equally historic commercial center that still reaches out into the harbor.

For the last three years I have been exploring these places, trying to get a fix on the long-lost topography that is essential to understanding how Boston’s former residents interacted. Boston in the 1770s was a land-connected island with a population of about fifteen thousand, all of whom probably recognized, if not knew, each other. Being myself a resident of an island with a year-round population very close in size to provincial Boston’s, I have some familiarity with how petty feuds, family alliances, professional jealousies, and bonds of friendship can transform a local controversy into a supercharged outpouring of communal angst. The issues are real enough, but why we find ourselves on one side or the other of those issues is often unclear even to us. Things just happen in a way that has little to do with logic or rationality and everything to do with the mysterious and infinitely complex ways that human beings respond to one another.

In the beginning there were three different colonial groups in Massachusetts. One group was aligned with those who eventually became revolutionaries. For lack of a better word, I will call these people “patriots.” Another group remained faithful to the crown, and they appear herein as “loyalists.” Those in the third and perhaps largest group were not sure where they stood. Part of what makes a revolution such a fascinating subject to study is the arrival of the moment when neutrality is no longer an option. Like it or not, a person has to choose.

It was not a simple case of picking right from wrong. Hindsight has shown that, contrary to what the patriots insisted, Britain had not launched a preconceived effort to enslave her colonies. Compared with other outposts of empire, the American colonists were exceedingly well off. It’s been estimated that they were some of the most prosperous, least-taxed people in the Western world. And yet there was more to the patriots’ overheated claims about oppression than the eighteenth-century equivalent of a conspiracy theory. The hyperbole and hysteria that so mystified the loyalists had wellsprings that were both ancient and strikingly immediate. For patriots and loyalists alike, this was personal.

Because a revolution gave birth to our nation, Americans have a tendency to exalt the concept of a popular uprising. We want the whole world to be caught in a blaze of liberating upheaval (with appropriately democratic results) because that was what worked so well for us. If Gene Sharp’s From Dictatorship to Democracy, the guidebook that has become a kind of bible among twenty-first- century revolutionaries in the Middle East and beyond, is any indication, the mechanics of overthrowing a regime are essentially the same today as they were in the eighteenth century. And yet, given our tendency to focus on the Founding Fathers who were at the Continental Congress in Philadelphia when all of this was unfolding in and around Boston, most of us know surprisingly little about how the patriots of Massachusetts pulled it off.

In the pages that follow, I hope to provide an intimate account of how over the course of just eighteen months a revolution transformed a city and the towns that surrounded it, and how that transformation influenced what eventually became the Unites States of America. This is the story of two charismatic and forceful leaders (one from Massachusetts, the other from Virginia), but it is also the story of two ministers (one a subtle, even Machiavellian, patriot, the other a punster and a loyalist); of a poet, patriot, and caregiver to four orphaned children; of a wealthy merchant who wanted to be everybody’s friend; of a conniving traitor whose girlfriend betrayed him; of a sea captain from Marblehead who became America’s first naval hero; of a bookseller with a permanently mangled hand who after a 300-mile trek through the wilderness helped to force the evacuation of the British; and of many others. In the end, the city of Boston is the true hero of this story. Whether its inhabitants came to view the Revolution as an opportunity or as a catastrophe, they all found themselves in the midst of a survival tale when on December 16, 1773, three shiploads of tea were dumped in Boston Harbor.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
1,214 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Chris
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Read Before You Visit the Sites
Reviewed in the United States on December 29, 2017
I''ve read this book twice, the second time right before a vacation to Boston. I took the book, and had a religious experience at the Concord bridge as I read the bridge story on a bench next to the bridge. The wife and I also spent a day driving to the three Joseph Warren... See more
I''ve read this book twice, the second time right before a vacation to Boston. I took the book, and had a religious experience at the Concord bridge as I read the bridge story on a bench next to the bridge. The wife and I also spent a day driving to the three Joseph Warren statues in the area - inspired by this book!

I was disappointed that this book is NOT for sale at the Lexington and Bunker Hill gift shops.

I follow this author. His Last Stand book went with me to Little Big Horn.
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Dave Thomas
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Too Good!
Reviewed in the United States on March 31, 2018
I encountered great difficulty while reading this book. It was hard to get through, but not because it was poorly written or historically inaccurate. In fact, I found the prose so enticing that I was compelled to read most of the pages over again, just to soak in all the... See more
I encountered great difficulty while reading this book. It was hard to get through, but not because it was poorly written or historically inaccurate. In fact, I found the prose so enticing that I was compelled to read most of the pages over again, just to soak in all the flavors. My wife asked why it was taking so long to read this book, and he only answer was that it is TOO GOOD to read just once. I didn''t want it to end, and I discovered so many facts about Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill that I never knew. This book was painstakingly researched and should be made into a major motion picture. The characters are vibrantly brought to life, and the pages read like a sweeping novel. Get this book! A fantastic read!
27 people found this helpful
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T. Voellinger
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Have not finished it yet, but so far I have to say "EXCELLENT"!
Reviewed in the United States on October 17, 2015
I have read a LOT of books on the Revolution, in fact it is all I have read for years now, and so far (have not finished this yet), this is one of the best I have read! I was surprised to find that this book is more than just the title! I have not even gotten to the Battle... See more
I have read a LOT of books on the Revolution, in fact it is all I have read for years now, and so far (have not finished this yet), this is one of the best I have read! I was surprised to find that this book is more than just the title! I have not even gotten to the Battle yet! In fact, not even up to Lexington & Concord yet! The book takes you through all of what transpired leading up to the start of the Revolution. Of course, since this is a lot of territory to cover, a lot of details are missing, that I have read in other books, BUT, there have been many, many details that I have not seen in other books. Its like the author knows what most people (that do any reading on the subject at all) already know so he skips over those and adds details that he knows are not in a lot of other books. In addition, the writing style is excellent, very enjoyable to read. If you are a student of the Revolution, I heartily recommend this book!
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Roadmaster
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If history class was like this book it would have been your favorite subject.
Reviewed in the United States on August 30, 2020
Bunker Hill is an absolutely amazing book! I raced through this and my only disappointment was that the book was over. I hated history when I was a high school student. Authors like Nathaniel Philbrick put life into the inspiring story of this country. The reader benefits... See more
Bunker Hill is an absolutely amazing book! I raced through this and my only disappointment was that the book was over. I hated history when I was a high school student. Authors like Nathaniel Philbrick put life into the inspiring story of this country. The reader benefits immensely from the author’s 3 years of research which pays off when he makes you feel that you are experiencing the American Revolution first hand. This is real history told the way it should be told. Our heritage must not be reduced to a list of events and dates to be memorized. It must be experienced and felt so we can understand the debt that we all owe the very human heroes who gave us this wonderful country. Honest and well informed people read books like this. The ignorant tear down statues.
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DaveF
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
History as few authors can tell it!
Reviewed in the United States on August 11, 2020
4 to 4.5 stars, author Nathaniel Philbrick has produced a piece of American history that is up to his usual high standards. He''s in the major leagues of history writers (McCullough, Sides, Kearns-Goodwin, Halberstam, etc.) and I think you could pick up any of his books and... See more
4 to 4.5 stars, author Nathaniel Philbrick has produced a piece of American history that is up to his usual high standards. He''s in the major leagues of history writers (McCullough, Sides, Kearns-Goodwin, Halberstam, etc.) and I think you could pick up any of his books and appreciate the story.
This books about much more than the battle of Bunker Hill (a misnomer anyway). Philbrick takes us through Boston''s entire involvement in the beginnings of the American Revolution, from the Tea Party to the British evacuation of Boston. On the way, we are introduced to all of the major players and get an intimate picture of what fighting was like in 1775. This book is a pretty comprehensive look at this portion of the Revolutionary War. I highly recommend it.
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Chris Randle
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good book, but not his best.
Reviewed in the United States on August 30, 2016
It is a very well researched book, and full of informative details. However, I didn''t think it was as good of a story (or as readable) as "Valliant Ambition", or "In the Heart of the Sea" (both of which were very good). If you are looking for specific info... See more
It is a very well researched book, and full of informative details. However, I didn''t think it was as good of a story (or as readable) as "Valliant Ambition", or "In the Heart of the Sea" (both of which were very good). If you are looking for specific info on Massachusetts during 1772-1776 then this book is a good reference. Not the easiest book to get into, but he definitely knows his stuff and is well researched. I only gave it three stars because it''s just not that entertaining of a read, and doesn''t have the storytelling aspect that he is known for in some of his other books. With that said, the research and information are of high quality, just understand that it''s extremely detailed about a very narrow part of the war, and doesn''t flow as well as his other books.
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Bunker Hill: Where a Battle, then Siege of Boston Became a Roaring Revolution
Reviewed in the United States on October 24, 2015
"Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution," by Nathaniel Philbrick, is a marvelous book that looks at the lead-up to and early stages of the American Revolution. It is well detailed. Most books covering this period of our American history cover the Battle of... See more
"Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution," by Nathaniel Philbrick, is a marvelous book that looks at the lead-up to and early stages of the American Revolution. It is well detailed. Most books covering this period of our American history cover the Battle of Concord and Lexington but stop short of including the Battle of Bunker Hill (which, incidentally, was fought in large part on Breed''s Hill in Charlestown) and the subsequent siege of Boston. This history provides the full story and is a must read for any history buff. The main cast of characters are here ... Dr. Joseph Warren who was killed at Bunker Hill; Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, et. al. and their British adversaries. Of the many books on this period that I have read, this is one of the best because it includes the Battle of Bunker Hill and the Siege of Boston, which galvanized the patriots of New England into revolutionary action and ignited the "embers" into full revolution in places such as New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and the Carolinas.
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Steven PetersonTop Contributor: Baseball
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The run up to Bunker Hill and the aftermath
Reviewed in the United States on January 21, 2014
This is a comprehensive history of the background of Bunker Hill and the aftereffects of that bloody battle. At the outset, it seems obligatory to note that the fight actually took place on Breed''s Hill. The book itself considers the various actions leading to an... See more
This is a comprehensive history of the background of Bunker Hill and the aftereffects of that bloody battle. At the outset, it seems obligatory to note that the fight actually took place on Breed''s Hill.

The book itself considers the various actions leading to an army of militiamen to surround British forces in Boston. The French and Indian War is discussed (quite a few Yankee leaders had had combat experience then). So, too, laws passed by Great Britain to pay for the debt incurred by British forces in that war--leading to anger in the colonies, as they were taxed without representation. Incidents such as the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party inflamed passions all around--patriots, loyalist, and Great Britain. The conflicts between militia and Redcoats at Lexington and Concord led to an army of militia focusing on Boston.

The book also spends considerable time outlining the key characters of the drama. On the British side, former Governor Hutchinson, Generals Thomas Gage, William Howe, and Henry Clinton were key players in the building of the drama culminating in Bunker Hill. On the patriot side, well known figures such as Sam Adams, John Adams, and John Hancock are discussed, So, too, a less well know figure, Joseph Warren. With the other three off at the Continental Congress, Warren played a leading role in organizing the patriots. Then, a much less wll known figure, a rabblerouser and trouble maker, who went by the nom de guerre of Joyce Junior. In fact, he was a part of one of the colony''s most eminent families.

After Bunker Hill, new figures became important--George Washington, taking command of the besieging forces at Boston, Henry Knox, who helped create an artillery arm for the army, and so on. The book does a nice job of describing the siege, Washington''s battle within himself, the dramatic capture of Dorchester Heights, and the subsequent withdrawal of British forces from Boston.

A wonderful resource for understanding the events and players leading up to the battle at Bunker Hill and what followed from that sanguinary event.
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Top reviews from other countries

J. McDonald
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Bunker Hill.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 25, 2015
Nathaniel Philbrick`s book covers the opening years of the War of Independence, concentrating on the Battle of Bunker Hill and ending with the siege and evacuation of Boston in 1776. This is a generally decent account of the social, political and - ultimately - military...See more
Nathaniel Philbrick`s book covers the opening years of the War of Independence, concentrating on the Battle of Bunker Hill and ending with the siege and evacuation of Boston in 1776. This is a generally decent account of the social, political and - ultimately - military situations faced by both sides in the ensuing conflict. A little American bias creeps in - understandable, perhaps, as it is widely believed by most Americans that the right guys won(!) but this doesn''t detract anything from the content of the book for the UK reader. Philbrick also puts Dr. Joseph Warren at centre-stage for large parts of his study, referencing him both in his opening pages and in his epilogue; Warren died at Bunker Hill – an early revolutionary martyr – history may well have played out very differently had he survived. There are copious reference notes for each chapter at the back of the book which indicate that the author has certainly done a great deal of research for this and he provides good background and contextual detail for the events he covers. He presents his narrative in a fairly open and non-judgemental style, though at times the conclusions and interpretations he perhaps intends the viewer to arrive at were not necessarily the ones I did. I''ll come clean at this stage and admit that having read a number of books on this subject, I have grown tired of earlier American historians regurgitating the old myths that muddied the waters and inevitably made one side saints and the other the very devils; Philbrick is, thank goodness, a more revisionist writer than that and he is, for the most part, pretty fair. All the same, I would have liked an answer to a question that has long troubled me; when the British mounted the raid on Concord in order to seize military supplies hidden there, it was known that a number of cannon had been spirited away from Boston to that location - Philbrick lists them on p.88 as” 4 brass field pieces, 2 mortars”. There were in fact 3, 24-pounder guns among them; these were not field guns but siege guns, heavy weapons requiring much man-power and large horse-teams to move and operate them and with only one purpose. Information of this may well explain the apparent haste with which the British expedition was put together. Why and how did these guns come to be in Boston? Who supplied/paid for them and when? As Philbrick is fond of saying at various points in the book, we''ll never know... He is not alone in skipping over this though, I`ve yet to read a proper analysis of this in any account of the battles of Lexington/Concord. I also feel that his telling of the evacuation of Boston isn''t quite accurate; the British had known for a long time that they would have to abandon the city and make the taking of New York City their main strategic goal; although the Patriots forced their hand, the evacuation wasn''t a completely panic-stricken event, but was a more orderly withdrawal, albeit with some compromise and hampered by a severe and damaging storm. A better and more balanced account, in my opinion, is offered by David McCullough in his Book 1776: America and Britain at War. This is, however, an enjoyable and thoroughly detailed read, well worth your time and useful as a study of this early period in the revolution.
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Robert F.
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Bunker Hill
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 18, 2013
While the author has undoubtedly spent a lot of time researching this book, it does not really translate into an interesting read. The author jumps backwards and forwards in time and tells the story from both sides of the battle. I''ve read other historical books that were...See more
While the author has undoubtedly spent a lot of time researching this book, it does not really translate into an interesting read. The author jumps backwards and forwards in time and tells the story from both sides of the battle. I''ve read other historical books that were based on a lot of research (e.g. ''The Island at the Center of the World'' by Russell Shorto) that still managed to make the book enjoyable to read.
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Mike Mellor
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Why Americans went to war with Britain.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 22, 2013
Anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of the American War of Independence, or has a vague idea of the Tea Party in Boston will enjoy this eminently readable account of the events leading up to the war, whilst giving life to the main players in the drama. Who has heard of King...See more
Anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of the American War of Independence, or has a vague idea of the Tea Party in Boston will enjoy this eminently readable account of the events leading up to the war, whilst giving life to the main players in the drama. Who has heard of King Philip''s war ? Was the Tea Party an act of trade protection ? Fascinating, giving new insights to those momentous days. A compelling read, quite unlike traditional heavy history books.
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Stephen Gilbert
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 16, 2018
a good read.
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Sid B.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 26, 2018
A very good read even-handedly written without demonising the British position.
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